Kids Can Learn And Discover With Tumble Leaf

Thanks to KidzVuz for introducing us to this show and sponsoring this post to help encourage lifelong creative learning.

This Friday, May 6th, new episodes from the second season of the Amazon Original Series, Tumble Leaf will be available for Prime members on Amazon Prime Video. Though we have had Amazon Prime for a while, we just recently started using the video portion of our subscription. The boys were excited to discover new shows and when I learned about this one I knew we had to check it out.

The stop-motion animated show revolves around Fig, a delightfully curious blue fox, and his best, wiggliest caterpillar friend Stick who embark on new nature-filled adventures and discover science through play. I love shows that are educational and there was plenty for the kids to learn from this show. One of the first things I noticed, as a parent, was that the language was very advanced for the age the show was geared for. It works though because the new vocabulary words were used in context so young children could figure out what they mean. There was also a lot of rhyming and alliteration throughout the episodes.

While watching the show the boys were engaged the whole time (which seems to be a rare occurrence nowadays). After watching a few episodes they begged to watch more. With Jacob turning eight next month I wasn’t sure if this show would interest him as much as it would interest Lucas but he loves it and I’m happy to have a wholesome show for him to watch that fosters creative learning unlike some of the tween shows he sometimes watches.

Not only do my kids and I like the show but it seems everyone else does as well. The show has won eight daytime Emmy awards, two Parents’ Choice awards and a slew of other awards. If you have Amazon Prime I recommend checking this show out and catching the all new episodes this weekend. If you don’t have Prime what are you waiting for? With free 2-day shipping, music, movies, shows and more it is used nonstop here in our house! Try Amazon Prime 30-Day Free Trial

Comments

  1. And even if the informal learning lands on kids with a similar impermanence, it feels like Tumble Leaf is trying to light the way toward discovery rather than whonk kids over the head with educational factoids, and that feels right to me.

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