Protect Your Devices With Trend Micro This School Year {Giveaway}

Internet security is something that should be taken very seriously. I was a brand Ambassador for Trend Micro for a year as a “Digital Jones” family but even now, months after my contract ended, I still rely on them to keep my family safe. When I heard about their back-to-school sale I knew I had to share it with you because 1) it’s a great product 2) who doesn’t love to save money and 3) this is one of the most important back-to-school purchases you will make.

As you know, technology is changing daily, making it challenging for parents to keep up.  Parents are concerned not only with what their kids are sharing online, but also with what they are receiving and viewing online. Trend Micro want to help make parent’s lives easier.

Now through September 2, Trend Micro Titanium Maximum Security is only $44.95 (usually $89.95).  This software will protect up to 3 devices (laptops, desktop computers, tablets, smartphones, etc.), whether they are PC, Mac, or Android for an entire year: http://www.trendmicro.com/us/home/products/titanium/max-security/index.html

Here are just a few awesome features of Trend Micro Max Security:

  • Monitors and protects kids on social network websites like Facebook and Twitter
  • Restricts web content and access to desktop applications, and sets an access schedule for your kids
  • Identifies settings that may leave a family’s personal information vulnerable using the new Privacy Scanner For Facebook feature
  • Indicates dangerous links on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Pinterest, MySpace, Sina Weibo and Mixi

Trend Micro also offers a free 30 day trial so you can see how you like the software before you buy it:  http://www.trendmicro.com/us/security/products/index.html

GIVEAWAY:

One lucky reader will win Trend Micro Titanium Maximum Security software which will cover up to 3 devices for 1 year

HOW TO ENTER:

 {Do any or all of the following, leave a separate comment for each you do}

1) Leave a comment telling me why you want to win

2) Share this giveaway on a social network

3) Follow Trend Micro on Twitter

4) Follow me on Twitter

5) Leave a comment on another blog post

Giveaway ends September 2, 2013 at 11:59pm Central time. Must be 21 or older and a US citizen to win.

(Disclosure: As stated above, I was a Trend Micro Ambassador for a year but that campaign is now over. I was not compensated for this post.)

Internet Security In The New Year

Since March of last year my family has been a participant in the Digital Joneses study. This study is organized by Internet security company Trend Micro and follows seven bloggers {and our families} throughout the year as we complete monthly technology challenges. The goal of the study is to help improve and examine the struggles each family experiences with modern technology. Each challenge has identified and addressed one facet of digital security that is affecting living in a modern digitally-connected household.

I was asked to think about what I have learned so far and what I hope to learn in this new year. When I look back I realize that I’ve learned a lot about a variety of different topics relating to online security. I wanted to share a few things that I learned from each monthly challenge I have completed and also what I hope to still learn in the coming months.

The first challenge was to complete an online quiz called “Are You {Digitally} Smarter Than A 5th Grader?”. Having been online for years and “tech-savvy” I learned that I didn’t know as much as I thought I had. For example, I couldn’t even distinguish the real Facebook logo from three look alikes! It definitely made me think about the sites I frequented and how I would have to double check the address bar before I put any personal information or passwords in a site I thought I was on. Sinisa learned a lot in this challenge too, including the difference between “http” and “https” in web addresses. Do you know the difference between the two?

The second challenge was to talk to our children about online safety. Trend Micro had some great tips on how to talk to children about this topic and even had some ideas on how I could do so with my preschooler. My boys aren’t online a lot by themselves but they do like YouTube videos and so we talked about safety on YouTube and how they shouldn’t click on anything if they don’t know what it is.

The third challenge was to spring clean our digital lives. They provided us with a checklist so we’d know what kind of things they suggested doing. The main things that stuck out to me during this challenge were suggestions on tackling the email inbox. One suggestion from Trend Micro was to delete the attachments from my emails. Another task on the list was to delete any emails that had password or account information to keep would be hackers from getting confidential information. I really got a lot out of that challenge.

The next challenge was on mobile security. I didn’t even know that I needed security software for my phone so that was a huge thing I learned. I was told of a cool app called the “Trend Micro Mobile Security Personal Ed” app that would scan every application I wanted to install to make sure it was safe. That was definitely something I wanted to do before putting any apps on my phone.

After mobile security, we learned about online gaming. I learned that 41 percent of homes with kids five and under have internet connected game consoles and that more kids access the internet through game consoles than through a computer. Five and under! That’s a lot of young kids online and it’s important that they are safe while playing. I learned a handful of tips but one I didn’t know about was parental controls. I knew that TVs had them but I learned that gaming systems had them, too.

In July we tackled scams surrounding the Olympics. I never knew how many fake sites existed surrounding the summer games and how many of them looked like the real thing. This was another reminder to use the “official” sites as resources and not go to sites I was unfamiliar with.

August brought a scary story about a man who had his digital life stolen in less than an hour because all of his accounts were hooked together. It really made me think twice before I hook up any accounts. I learned about two-factor authentication on email accounts to keep my accounts out of the wrong hands.

The following month we learned some internet security facts and how we could protect ourselves online. Having secure passwords was a big focus of this challenge. Trend Micro suggests using a phrase of random words that you can remember, instead of paraphrases or single words. Having passwords of at least ten to twelve characters is a good start and they recommend more characters for passwords that protect sensitive sites (like banks).

Last month‘s challenge was focused on cyber shopping and Trend Micro shared tips on how to stay safe online while doing our Christmas shopping. Being fairly new to online shopping I learned a lot about this topic. They stressed using reliable, well-known shopping sites and making sure that they offered secure payment options. Another tip was to use a credit card to pay since they offer better buyer protection.

When I look at what I have learned and think about what I still hope to learn in the coming months I think that most of it revolves around how how my children and I use the internet. I’d love to learn more ways to protect my boys while they are on YouTube since parental controls don’t block everything I’d like to be blocked. For myself, I’d love to learn how to stay safer while using social media- particularly when it comes to links on Twitter and while on blogs that have pop-ups that slow the computer down.

I’m looking forward to the next few months of learning and so thankful for this opportunity to work with Trend Micro. To end I just wanted to share four facts I’ve learned about digital security since becoming a Digital Joneses family (please forgive the fact that I sound like a frog!)

 

(Disclosure: This post is part of a study sponsored by Trend Micro that I am participating in. As a Digital Joneses family we are receiving assets to complete our challenges but all thoughts are my own.)

Internet Security Stats & How To Protect Yourself Online

Trend Micro shared the above stats with me as part of my participation in the year long Digital Joneses family study. I have learned so much about internet safety in the past months but every time they share statistics with me I am shocked by one or two of them. This month was no exception.

I couldn’t believe that 6% of people friend everyone that asks to be their friend on Facebook, even if they don’t know them! When I think about everything people post on their personal Facebook pages including where they are, phone numbers, addresses, and pictures the amount of private information that our “friends” have access to could be dangerous. The person you “friend” could be waiting for you to announce a vacation so they can find out when the perfect time to rob your home is. Another issue I have with Facebook are the pages that say you have to “friend” them to view the information on their page. You don’t know who is behind the page and I don’t think there is any reason you’d have to give them access to your personal information to join the page.

So what can you do to protect yourself online when it comes to the statistics above? Trend Micro suggests the following:

1) Manage your online accounts with secure passwords. They suggest using a phrase of random words that you can remember, instead of paraphrases or single words. Having passwords of at least ten to twelve characters is a good start and they recommend more characters for passwords that protect sensitive sites (like banks). You should also avoid using the same passwords for multiple sites, especially if it’s a password that has been cracked by hackers before.

2) Know and use the privacy settings of your social networking accounts and mobile apps. The security settings are consistently changing and new ones are being added on a regular basis so it’s important to pay attention to information that social networks share with their members and update your privacy settings accordingly.

3) Regularly back up your data. Computers contain documents and pictures that hold valuable content and memories. Backing up your data ensures that none of that is lost.

4) Install a security software in all your devices.Trend Micro goes to great lengths to identify online threats and make it easy for you to protect yourself and your family from them with Trend Micro™ Titanium™ Security. Titanium is easy-to-use, yet comprehensive protection for what you do online every day – emailing, socializing, surfing the web — and it won’t pester you with alerts and pop-ups.

(Disclosure: I have received technology and software from Trend Micro over the past months as a participant in the Digital Joneses campaign. I use Trend Micro software to protect my computer and my mobile devices.)

5 Tips To Protect Your Online Identity

Think about all of the things you do online. You email, you save and share pictures, you connect with family and friends on social networks, you bookmark recipes and ideas you want to do in the future…now imagine if one day you logged in and everything was GONE. How would you feel? This is what happened to Mat Honan. Within one hour hackers were able to destroy Mat’s digital life, including erasing everything on his iPhone, iPad and Macbook. He shared the whole story, including his mistakes and Apple’s huge security flaws, over at Wired. Mat eventually got 75% of his hard drive back but it cost him over $1600 to do so and he still lost some important documents and emotionally valuable photos.

Trend Micro brought this story to my attention and asked me, as one of their Digital Joneses bloggers, to share Mat’s story with you all and how we can make sure it doesn’t happen to us. They also sent our family tablets and stressed the importance of securing our tablets like we do our laptops. Trend Micro shared 5 things we can do to secure our tablets {and really our digital life in general}:

Tip #1:

Tip #2:

Tip #3:

Tip #4:

Tip #5:

I thought these were great tips. Some I use already, like receiving emails when someone signs into my Facebook account from a location I never have used before and not saving my credit card info on sites. Some were things I had never considered before, like leaving my social media pages open on my computer and linking sites together. Those things that make it easy for me to quickly get things done online also make it easy for hackers to access personal details.

Do you follow all of the tips above? If not, which ones do you struggle with following?

Past Challenges:

Are you {Digitally} Smarter Than a 5th Grader

Talking About Online Safety With My Preschooler

Spring Clean Your Digital Life

Mobile Security

Online Gaming Safety Tips For Children & Teens

The Olympics, Scams & You

(Disclosure: This post is part of a study sponsored by Trend Micro that I am participating in. As a Digital Joneses family we are receiving assets to complete our challenges but all thoughts are my own.)

The Olympics, Scams & You

As one of the families in Trend Micro’s Digital Joneses campaign I get a new challenge each month that focuses on online safety. This month’s challenge has to do with internet scams that may come via email or be found on social networks. I get scams like this all of the time telling me that I’ve won money. I know better than to fall for any of these scams but people less familiar with the internet may not. According to Senior Threat Researcher Robert McArdle believes that “…attackers are still using these because these scams are still giving them successful margins. Social engineering has worked for years and there are little signs of that changing.”

Scammers will use large events to target people and the Olympic games, probably the largest sporting event in the world, is no exception. To help consumers identify possible scams they will be susceptible to, Trend Micro created a fun little quiz to determine which type of viewer they are of the Olympics. There are four “types” of viewers: The fanatic, the loyal supporter, the avid social watcher, and the curious observer.

I took the quiz and was not surprised to find out that I ended up being a “curious observer”. I am not a big Olympic games watcher because I honestly don’t have the time to watch the games. In past years I have watched the opening ceremonies and really enjoyed them but this year I wasn’t home to watch them. I hope in future years to introduce the boys to them.

After the quiz I read through Trend Micro’s ebook for “curious observers” of the Olympics. It told me that I should be on the lookout for search result fraud and social media fraud. Something that may look like a valid link to scores, medal counts, or videos of the games could really be links to sites that will infect my computer with viruses. The suggestion from Trend Micro was to go right to trusted sources when looking for information on the Olympic games. I thought this was a great idea since I tend to use search engines for information I am looking for. Here is a link to the official site: olympic.org.

To keep up to date on current scams that have been found in regards to the Olympics you can check out the Trend Micro blog. They have a large list of scams that have already been found. The most common seem to be sites that claim to be live streaming the games so be careful and check the sites you are watching the games on! Looking at them I probably wouldn’t know that they are not legit because some of them look very similar to the official site. Smartphone users beware as well because there are some fake Olympics apps that have been found in the Google Play store.

Example of a fake website claiming to live stream the Olympics and sell tickets to the games!

Here are some more tips from Trend Micro:

Ignore any communication that asks you to reveal information, such as bank details or to pay any amounts of money up front. London 2012 will only ever use a secure website to collect personal or bank card details. Look for a padlock symbol in the browser window. The website address will begin with ‘https://’. If you click on the padlock, your browser will either give our full title (London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Ltd), or identify our sites as part of london2012.com. If you don’t see a padlock, or if the site name is not what you are expecting, then you should not enter personal or financial information into the page.

***
Have you seen any Olympic related scams yet this year?

(Disclosure: As part of the Digital Joneses campaign I have received software and technology products from Trend Micro. All thoughts are my own.)

Online Gaming Safety Tips For Children & Teens

A recent Trend Micro Digital Joneses survey found that 41 percent of homes with kids five and under have internet connected game consoles and that more kids access the internet through game consoles than through a computer, so keeping kids safe while gaming is more important than ever. 

Wow! I couldn’t believe that statistic. I even emailed to verify that it was really five and under and wasn’t supposed to say five and over. When it comes to online gaming it is very important to start the safety education at a young age. Trend Micro has provided me with some great tips on how to keep children safe while gaming and I wanted to share a few of them with you all.

Stay Involved – When I was growing up my parents kept the family computer in the tv room like the “experts” suggested. As children, we were always mindful that our parents were there and we could ask them questions or talk to them about concerns we had while we were online. I think any gaming console that has the capability to be connected to the internet should follow this same rule. Keeping your gaming console in a common area of your home gives parents an idea of how much time their kids are spending using it and what types of games they are playing without having to be invasive. Games are also a fun way for families to spend time together.
Rely on Ratings – Just like movies have ratings, so do video games. The entertainment Software Rating Board rates games and the ratings can give both children and parents an idea as to the content of the games. Each family can then decide which ratings are age appropriate for their children. It’s also important for parents to preview each game so they know what their children are playing. Some parents may be okay with violence but not language, or car chases but not violence, so it’s always important to see why games are rated how they are. {Common Sense Media is a great website to get ratings for games along with movies, tv shows, websites, music, and more.}
Use Parental Controls – Gaming consoles have parental controls so that you can block kids from accessing games that aren’t age-appropriate.  You can also set limits on how much time they spend gaming and who they play with. Parents can also disable internet access on some gaming devices so they can ensure that their children aren’t interacting with people that they do not know.

Want to learn more about online gaming safety? Trend Micro has created a great ebook called “Level Up and Secure Your Online Gaming Experience”. You can view the ebook here.

What do you do to keep your children safe while they are gaming online?

(Disclosure: As part of the Digital Joneses campaign I have received software and technology products from Trend Micro. All thoughts are my own.)

Mobile Security With Trend Micro

As a family in the Digital Joneses campaign for Trend Micro we have a challenge to complete every month. This month’s challenge was focused on mobile security and staying safe while on the go. To complete the challenge we received smartphones and were told that we should try doing everything we need to do online using only a phone. Working from home I am online 70-80 hours a week so I knew that doing all my work from a phone was not realistic but I aimed to do as much as possible on it as I could.

The first thing I did after I set up my phone was to install some of Trend Micro’s android applications. The first was their free Android security app called “Trend Micro Mobile Security Personal Ed”. This application will protect my phone from loss, malicious apps, and dangerous website. It includes an app scanner that will scan every application that I install to make sure it’s safe. It also includes a trial of some of their premium features including safe surfing, parental controls, call and text blocking, a way to find your loss phone using google maps, an alarm if your phone is lost and you are looking for it, and a way to lock and wipe the device if you lose it and you can’t find it. All of these extra features sounded great. I especially loved all of the features it offered for lost phones since that is one of the worst things that could happen to my phone.

The next app that I added was their Longetivity app to extend my phone’s battery life. It never fails that my phone dies within a few hours of me leaving my house, especially if I use it as a GPS to get to my location. I liked that this app was easy to use. The “Just-a-phone” mode can be used when the battery is low so that the phone can still be used for calls and texts. You can also see which apps are taking the most battery power which is helpful when you want to preserve your battery life.

The final application I added was their Backup and Restore app. This free app makes a secure copy of my contacts, messages, photos and videos and lets me restore them to any Android device I’d like to. We could have really used this feature in the past when one of Sinisa’s phones got broken. All the pictures that were on it from when our children were little were lost. Those images are something we can never get back.

Once I got the applications loaded I got started on my challenge. The first thing I did was check the longetivity application to see how much battery power my phone had. It showed 13 hours and if I used the “just-a-phone” mode I would have 15 hours of battery time. I kept this in mind so I could use this feature when I wasn’t using the internet or applications.

Trend Micro had challenged us to use our smartphones and try doing at least four items on a list of tasks. The first task of the challenge I wanted to complete was downloading a Pinterest app and creating a Pinterest board but when I went to the Android store on my phone and searched “Pinterest” there were 318 apps that came up. Looking through the list I didn’t see one that looked like it was from Pinterest so I moved on to another task. I figured I should probably check my emails so I setup my email account and was happy to find that I had no problem doing so. My last Android phone never let me setup the email feature with my hotmail address. Once I started checking the emails I found that I had to click on the message header and then wait for the message to download. After a few minutes of the message trying to download I gave up and moved onto a different task. The next task I tried was streaming videos on YouTube. I searched for videos on blogging and watched a few videos, including one by Darren Rowse on family/blogging balance. I loved how clear the picture was on this new phone. I then watched a live lip dub marriage proposal which had me cracking up. The last task that I did was downloaded a picture to Facebook.

This month’s challenge was fun. The majority of what I do on my phone is check my emails and Facebook so it was nice to do some other things that I normally don’t take time to do, like watch videos on YouTube. I am happy that I have some great Trend Micro applications to help me stay safe while I use my phone for work and entertainment. We received two phones so we decided we would give Jacob {our 3, soon to be 4 year old} one for his birthday so that he can watch videos, play games and take pictures instead of using mommy or daddy’s phones. With the ability to setup parental controls on his phone in addition to us sitting with him we feel that he will be safe while exploring the internet using this new technology.

Here are some additional safety tips from Trend Micro to keep in mind:

1) Enable your password on your mobile device. Make sure it is not an easy password that others can guess.

2) If you ever experience your mobile device turning off and on unexpectedly, or sending unauthorized messages to your contacts, you should know it is infected with a virus.

3) Trust the source, not the application. Make it a habit to download applications only from trusted sources.

4) Update your phone as soon as your phone alerts you that there is a new update.

4) Pay attention when installing applications. If an app asks for access to irrelevant data (like a game asks for access to your phone book) immediately stop installation and recheck the source.

5) Beware when using public wi-fi. Avoid accessing sensitive personal data while using it.

(Disclosure: As part of the Digital Joneses campaign I have received software and technology products from Trend Micro. All thoughts are my own.)

Spring Clean Your Digital Life

Every Spring people talk about spring cleaning their homes. The purging of unused items, organizing, and deep cleaning of the house is a great way to start this new season but what about tidying up the things others don’t see? Things like your email inbox, your computer’s storage files, and your online security measures?

As a family in Trend Micro’s Digital Joneses, our challenge of the month was to spring clean our digital life. I didn’t know where to start. With thousands of pictures stored online, even more unread emails in my inbox, and so many files with contents that are a mystery to me I was overwhelmed. Thankfully, Trend Micro has created a digital spring cleaning checklist. Being an avid to-do list maker and checklist lover this made me very excited :)

The first task that I wanted to do was to clean out my inbox. I have over 9,000 emails in my inbox folder and over 3500 of those haven’t been opened. I have been trying to go through it and either delete or sort emails but it’s a daunting task. Looking over the checklist I saw a few more things I wanted to do when it came to my inbox. One suggestion from Trend Micro was to delete the attachments from my emails. Another task on the list was to delete any emails that had password or account information. It’s a great way to keep would be hackers from getting confidential information.

The next step was to go through my web browser history. This is something that I have never done before. The checklist also suggested that I go through my bookmarks and delete ones I don’t need anymore. This wasn’t too hard since I don’t really use bookmarks that often.

After this I needed to sort through my documents. The checklist suggested sorting them into three categories- delete {documents we don’t need}, confidential {documents that need to be secured with a password}, and important {documents that should be backed up}. I had a lot of old documents that I didn’t need anymore so I was able to delete them. I only had a couple things that were confidential. Most of my documents are just things I wanted to keep {like pictures} so I need to back them up. That is still not crossed off on my list. Programs that are unused need to be deleted, too but I didn’t have any programs to delete since I only download what I need.

The next steps include running scans on the computer. I used to do this often since I’m used to my computers running slow and I have found that running troubleshooting and maintenance scans make it run faster. My new computer is running fine so I skipped this step.

One of the last steps is to make sure your digital life is secure by changing your passwords. It’s recommended that passwords be changed at least every three months. This is something that I often forget to do on a regular basis but probably one of the most important steps in this whole process. Trouble remembering multiple logins and passwords? Trend Micro has a product that will manage website passwords and login IDs in one secure location so you only have to remember one password!

Once your digital life is clean and your house is clean, imagine how amazing you will feel! Find out more about the Digital Joneses here.

(Disclosure: I am receiving technology and software as a member of the Digital Joneses blogger study but all thoughts are my own.)

Talking About Online Safety With My Preschooler

I shared previously that my family is part of a year long study with Trend Micro called The Digital Joneses. Each month we are given internet security related challenges. Last month Sinisa and I had to take a quiz to see how technologically savvy we were and this month we have to have “the talk” with our kids {no, not the one about the birds and the bees… the other important talk- the one about internet safety}.

Out of the seven bloggers in the study, I have the youngest children so I wasn’t sure how to approach the subject of online safety since Jacob is not on social networks and he doesn’t go online without my supervision. One thing he does do though is go on YouTube to watch videos. He is three so he is watching video clips from kid shows but occasionally a video will come up that was made by an adult. A lot of times it’s just the same clip of the cartoon with inappropriate music playing in the background but it’s still something I don’t want him watching. And if something like that can show up in search results for his favorite shows, it makes me wonder what other things can pop up.

In preparing for “the talk” I checked out the Trend Micro website and looked over the questions they had put together for parents to use as conversation starters. {You can find the questionnaire with questions for children of all ages here.} I knew that I would have to keep the questions really basic but they gave me good ideas on what to talk about.

The first question that I asked my preschooler was what he liked to do on daddy’s phone. {We don’t call it the internet and he usually uses his dad’s phone to go on the internet so that’s why I worded it the way I did.}

Jacob’s reply- “Watch Videos. Thomas game. Cars game.”

The next question I asked him was what he would do if something came up on the screen that wasn’t Cars or Thomas?

His reply- “Click it.”

Umm. That’s a problem. I explained to him that if something came up on the screen that wasn’t Cars or Thomas or anything he watches on television it was important that he show it to mommy or daddy right away. I also told him he should not click on anything but one of his shows.

The last question I asked him was why he thought that mommy and daddy needed to watch him while he watched his movies and played his games on daddy’s phone.

His reply- “Cause I want dad be happy.”

Well that was a good answer. I also added that there could be bad things on there so mommy and daddy needed to watch him so he didn’t see bad things.

He said- “bad things?”,  paused for a second, and then said “I go upstairs now?” I breathed a sigh of relief that further explanation of all the bad things he could find online was a conversation that could wait till he was older. And honestly? It’s one that I wish I never had to have in the first place!

***

Keep up with the Digital Joneses here.

(Disclosure: I am receiving technology and software as a member of the Digital Joneses blogger study but all thoughts are my own.)

Introducing The Digital Joneses Study

I have been waiting for about a month and a half now to share my exciting news and I’m finally able to– I will be participating in a study called “The Digital Joneses”. This study is organized by Internet security company Trend Micro and will follow seven bloggers {and our families} throughout the year as we complete monthly technology challenges. The goal of the study is to help improve and examine the struggles each family experiences with modern technology. Each challenge will identify and address one facet of digital security that is affecting living in a modern digitally-connected household.

Before I share about the first challenge I wanted to introduce the other bloggers that will be participating. They are Max from Attention Max, Lori from A Day In Motherhood, Stacie from The Divine Miss Mommy, Carol from NYCityMama, Michael from HighTechDad, and Stephanie from And Twins Make 5. You can learn more about the families here. I’m so honored to be part of such a wonderful group of successful bloggers!

For our first challenge, Sinisa and I had to take an online IQ quiz called: “Are You {Digitally} Smarter Than A 5th Grader?” Having been blogging since 2008 and online a lot longer than that I thought for sure I would ace the quiz. I ended up getting a score of 12 out of 16 and got the title of “security student”. Sinisa took the quiz and got an 8 out of 16 which was a “security wannabe”. Sinisa didn’t know the difference between “http” and “https” which I knew. On the flip side it asked to identify the Facebook logo and I got the question wrong. Seriously? I’ve been on that social network for years and have even gotten friends hooked on it but I couldn’t even pick the right logo out of four different ones. I also got a question wrong about networks that use cloud computing. I have heard of cloud computing but am not sure what exactly it is.

It’s obvious that I have a lot to learn about internet security still. Being online as much as I am it’s important to me to keep myself and my family safe as we work and play online. I look forward to the coming months and learning more about how I can do that.

How much do you know about internet security? Think you would get a better score than I did? Take the quiz and find out and then leave a comment below! I’d love to see how you all do on it.

(Disclosure: As stated above, this post is part of a study sponsored by Trend Micro that I am participating in. As a Digital Joneses family we are receiving assets to complete our challenges but all thoughts are my own.)