Change Your Clock, Change Your Battery {Giveaway}

(Disclosure: This is a sponsored post but all thoughts are my own.)

Did you know that home fires take the lives of more than 2,500 people each year in the United States? Most of these deadly fires happen while the people in the home are sleeping. I used to think that this was because they didn’t have smoke detectors but this is not the case. 71 percent of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries, and according to the National Fire Protection Association, three out of five fatal fire injuries take place in homes without working smoke alarms.

Those are alarming statistics. Today, an issue at the forefront of fire safety is not installing smoke alarms, but keeping smoke alarms working because households with non‐working smoke alarms now outnumber those with no smoke alarms. One company doing their part to bring this issue to the public’s attention is Energizer. They, along with local fire departments, have been holding events all throughout the country this month.

The easiest way to remember to change the batteries in your smoke detectors is to get in the habit of doing it when you change your clocks for Daylight Savings Time. A few extra seconds can make all the difference when trying to escape safely during a fire so it’s important to have a working smoke detector. This is also a good time to talk to your children about fire safety! You can find some coloring pages here.

Learn more about Energizer’s initiatives by following Energizer on Twitter or liking their Facebook page.

GIVEAWAY:

2 winners will each receive the Energizer prize package featured above that includes a smoke detector, 2 pack 9V Energizer® batteries, 12-inch Energizer® Bunny, Energizer® foam bunny ears, coloring book, journal and pen.

HOW TO ENTER:

Leave a comment telling me something you learned by reading this post

For an extra entry, share this giveaway on social media and leave a comment below

 Giveaway ends November 22, 2014 at 11:49pm CST. Must be 21 or older and a US resident to enter.

Comments

  1. 71 percent of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries, and according to the National Fire Protection Association, three out of five fatal fire injuries take place in homes without working smoke alarms.

  2. I learned to change the batteries in my smoke detectors at the same time as changing my clocks at Daylight savings time.

  3. I learned that 71 percent of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries, and according to the National Fire Protection Association hree out of five fatal fire injuries take place in homes without working smoke alarms.

  4. Betsy Barnes says

    I learned that 71 percent of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries, and according to the National Fire Protection Association, three out of five fatal fire injuries take place in homes without working smoke alarms. :)

  5. Betsy Barnes says
  6. I learned this fact: 71 percent of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries.

  7. Change your batteries when you change your clocks!

  8. To remember easily, change your batteries when you set your clocks back/forward

  9. 2,500 Peaple die each year from smoke detectors that have a dead battery or are disconnected. Three out of Five Injuries occur because of no working smoke detector. This is a tragedy!

  10. rochelle johnson says

    71 percent of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries,

  11. The state: 71 percent of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries, is concerning. it is easy to just not think of them and bother with their upkeep and maintenance.

  12. I was shocked to learn 71% of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries.

  13. Darlene Owen says

    I learned the best time to remember to change the batteries on your smoke alarm is to do it when you turn your clocks back.

  14. Darlene Owen says

    I shared on Facebook

  15. Darlene Owen says

    I shared on twitter

  16. Darlene Owen says

    I shared on pineterest

  17. I learned that home fires kill 2500 people a year in the U.S. :(

  18. 71% of failed smoke alarms were from misplaced batteries.

  19. Michele Behlen says

    I learned that 71% of smoke alarms did not work.

  20. I learned that 2,500 Americans each year die from fire. I didn’t know that.

  21. pinned–http://www.pinterest.com/pin/400046379374284469/

  22. fires take the lives of more than 2,500 people each year in the United States

  23. Brandy (Lynn W rafflecopter) says

    I learned 71 percent of smoke alarms that failed to operate had missing, disconnected or dead batteries.

  24. Dawn Monroe says

    I learned they offer coloring pages to start a safety discussion with kids.

  25. shared on facebook as amanda daniels hardesty

  26. I learned that most of these deadly fires happen while the people in the home are sleeping. That’s scarey…and a good reason to ensure that smoke detectors are working.

  27. I learned the best time to change the batteries in your smoke detector is day light savings time as it’s a yearly occurence.

  28. Nicole Sender says

    I learned to remember to change the batteries in my smoke detectors when I change my clocks for Daylight Savings Time.

  29. Nicole Sender says
  30. I learned that households with non‐working smoke alarms now outnumber those with no smoke alarms! That is so sad! :(

  31. soha molina says

    I learned: The easiest way to remember to change the batteries in your smoke detectors is to get in the habit of doing it when you change your clocks for Daylight Savings Time.

  32. soha molina says
  33. I didn’t realize that 71% of smoke detectors that failed were due to some kind of battery problem, something so simple…

  34. Ellie Wright says

    I learned to change the batteries when I change my clocks. Which is this weekend.

  35. Ellie Wright says
  36. From your post, here’s what I learned: Home fires take the lives of more than 2,500 people each year in the United States. That’s so very sad!

  37. Rebecca Williams says

    I learned that it’s a good idea to change the batteries in your smoke detector when the time changes

  38. Rebecca Williams says
  39. 71 % of failed smoke detectors had failed or missing batteries!

  40. 71 % of failed smoke detectors had failed or missing batteries!

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