Love Is Greater Than Hate

love is greater than hate

Weeks ago a story emerged in the news that caught the attention of many people, myself included. It was the tale of an ALS Ice Bucket challenge gone wrong. In Bay Village, Ohio three teens challenged one of their fellow students, a fourteen-year-old boy with Autism to take the ALS Ice bucket challenge. But instead of ice water, the teens dumped a bucket off the roof of a house filled with urine, spit and feces on the teen.

This story filled me with sadness and broke my heart to see kids doing something so cruel to a peer. The fact that this teenager has Autism gives me anxiety as I consider my own child’s future and how he will have to not only navigate life with Autism but learn how to exist with many who don’t understand him. While he will learn a lot as he grows up, I feel it’s my job as his mom to help teach him these things.

It’s also my job to try to make the world a better place for him and to prove that love is greater than hate. When I was contacted by GiveForward about working with them to promote a fundraiser for the boy and his family, I jumped at the opportunity. More so than raising money, it is a chance to show them that they are loved. The goal is to get a thousand people to leave words of encouragement! Please join us on the fundraiser page. Give if you can but whatever you do, please leave a comment filled with love.

 

Why I’m Still Fighting For Autism Awareness

Today, April 2nd, is Autism Awareness Day which many people have changed to Autism Acceptance Day. Here are my thoughts on why I’m still fighting for Autism awareness when many seem to have abandoned that cause in exchange for acceptance….

Yesterday, one of my Facebook friends posted about Autism saying that everyone is already aware of Autism. I’ve seen comments like that before from various people about how we don’t need Autism Awareness anymore but that we need Autism Acceptance instead. I agree that we need acceptance but I think we still need to be fighting for awareness. Until we have awareness of not only Autism existing but WHAT it is, we will never get the acceptance our Autistic community deserves.

You may be thinking that people *know* what Autism is already but I completely disagree. I believe most people have heard of it but I still believe that most people do not know what it is. Wondering why I think this? Because of comments I get like this….

  • “Your child doesn’t LOOK Autistic.”
  • “Will he outgrow it?”
  • “How did he get it?”
  • “My ______ (insert random person they know) has Autism and they _____ (insert random fact that makes them think they know what they are talking about)” and then assume my child is JUST like that person they kind of know.

The truth of the matter is that EVERY person who has Autism is different. It’s a spectrum disorder so no two cases of Autism will look exactly the same though there are sometimes similarities. Some of the above questions are asked by well-meaning people because they have questions and want to know more. Only after we (the Autism community) educate them on what Autism is will the process of acceptance truly be able to start.

So today, as everyone else pushes for acceptance, I’m going to continue pushing for awareness. The newest numbers show 1 in 68 children have Autism (it was 1 in 88). Autism is not going to disappear so I encourage everyone to learn more about it and then let’s talk about acceptance and inclusion.

 

Love You To Pieces Craft

love you to pieces craft

love you to pieces craft

Looking for a last minute Valentine’s Day craft? Check out this adorable heart that Lucas brought home from preschool! It has added meaning to the parents of all the children in his classroom since puzzle pieces are symbolic to parents of children who are on the Autism spectrum.

Making this craft is super simple. Draw a heart on a piece of paper, glue some puzzle pieces on to the heart, and then paint it any color your child would like. What a special craft to make and give to loved ones!

Tips For Parenting A Child With Sensory Processing Disorder

parenting a child with spd

Today’s guest post is from Celina Miller, a fellow special needs parent who is a passionate advocate for children affected with Autistic Spectrum Disorders.

How much sensory can my kid with Sensory Processing Disorder {SPD} take?

This is a question I’m faced with daily. My 12 year old has Asperger’s and with that comes the complex and confusing world of Sensory Processing Disorder. I never know what’s too much, or what’s not enough, sensory input for him. The other day, I’d finally convinced my son to help me clean up our playroom. As he put away toys and straightened up, I started the vacuum. Immediately, he put his hands over his ears and stood completely frozen. He was so overwhelmed he couldn’t even ask me to turn it off, nor could he leave the room. I was taken aback – this wasn’t like my high-functioning sixth grader who plays basketball and loves to dance. I knew the vacuum would bother him, but I thought he would get through it and we would move on.

So why was it that this time the vacuum completely shut him down – whereas before it didn’t? Or why is it that sometimes on the basketball court he covers his ears after the crowd roars and sometimes he’s completely unfazed? I never know how much sensory exposure he can take and so I never know how much I can expose him to – which often leaves me feeling just as uncomfortable as he is.

I feel like I’m flying by the seat of my pants when it comes to my son’s sensory issues. How can I know what he’ll react to, and when? The answer is I will never know, and the truth is he often doesn’t know as he’s still learning what works…or how he can make it work for him. If you’re a mom with a child on the spectrum or who has sensory integration dysfunction, you totally understand how I feel like the rug has been pulled out from underneath me, which is probably how my son feels when he’s overstimulated.

Here are five thoughts that help me, and may help you, get through a day in the life of the maze that is sensory integration disorder.

1. What doesn’t kill us only makes us stronger. A phrase I live by personally, but I have found it translates in the sensory world as well. I don’t avoid stimulating things. Exposing my son to different types of sensory stimuli helps him learn to cope with it and to be prepared the next time he comes across it. And while he may be bothered, it really won’t kill him. He will get over it. I never want to hinder him by what I think he may or may not be able to handle. In this world, I have to take his lead, give up control, and let him learn what works for him and what doesn’t.

2. Every day is a new day, and every day is different. I have learned that each sensory experience is interpreted differently every day. And depending on what else is going on during that experience, my son’s reaction may or may not be different. I’ve come to know that even a slight change in body temperature will make his sensory dysfunction… more dysfunctional. Just like he wakes up every day prepared for the unknown, so am I.

3. Talk about it. When I’m able to talk to my son about his sensory experience, we both understand it better. When I ask him to verbalize what he saw, heard, smelled or felt, he is able to learn from his experience and perhaps handle it differently next time. This conversation also helps me to better understand what’s going on in his world.

4. Don’t sympathize, empathize. I will never feel sorry for my son, I think he’s an amazing person with amazing gifts. He also has challenges to overcome and I do have empathy for that. I hurt when he hurts, and I smile when he smiles. When he’s left overwhelmed, in a different way, I am too. It is in this way that I can empathize with him.

5. Be an advocate. This will help you both. When I’m able to go before my son and tell people he has asperger’s – like at school, church or in sports – I’ve removed the elephant from the room. Is my son amazing and remarkable? yes. Is he also quirky and unbelievably inquisitive? yes. And when others have the opportunity to prepare themselves for the possibility that he may become overstimulated on the basketball court or during a burst of applause in the middle of the school play, everyone has the benefit of more understanding. And this understanding gives them the ability to see my son not for a quirky kid, but for that amazing boy who is gifted and overcoming challenges most of us couldn’t imagine. It gives people an opportunity to admire him – just as I do.

Celina Miller’s Bio

Celina Miller is the mother of Jim, who was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome when he was in the 2nd grade in 2009. Celina has worked tirelessly to gain the education support for her son’s civil right according to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Celina has worked with the Oasis Center for Women and Children and has spoken on the importance of supporting children with mental disorders and their families. She has also been active in fundraising and reviewing grants with Autism Speaks in the Birmingham, AL area

(All thoughts above are those of the guest post Author.)

 

The Sensory Child Gets Organized

sensory child

As a mom of a child on the Autism spectrum and another with un-diagnosed but suspected SPD/ADHD, life is sometimes completely chaotic at home. I know this is because my kids “hold it together” all day at school and then can finally be themselves at home but it is still extremely stressful at times. Since October is ADHD Awareness Month I was offered a book to review called “The Sensory Child Gets Organized” that promised to share “proven systems for rigid, anxious, or distracted kids” and was skeptical at first but so far I’m learning a lot from it.

In the book the author, Carolyn Dalgliesh, provides simple, effective solutions that help kids thrive at home and in their day-to-day activities and helps parents:

  • Understand what makes their sensory child tick
  • Create harmonious spaces through sensory organizing
  • Use structure and routines to connect with their child
  • Prepare their child for social and school experiences
  • Make travel a successful and fun-filled journey

With The Sensory Child Gets Organized, parents get an easy-to-follow road map to success that makes life easier—and more fun—for your entire family. I like how the book includes picture examples of schedules and spaces along with writing space for parents working through the book. There are also some great resources in the back of the book.

Here are a few tips that I’ve learned so far and plan on implementing with my kids:

1) Arrive at birthday parties (or any event where there will be a lot of people) early so the kids can have some time to get comfortable with the location in a small group before there is a large crowd

2) When thinking about the upcoming holiday events make a “must do” list for your sensory child. Consider letting them skip events so they can have a little downtime and enjoy the events you really want them to go to.

3) Organize feelings by having the child rate where they are on a scale of 1 to 10 (with words or pictures). Jacob seems to get just as upset about tiny things as he does about big things so I want to start having him rate his feelings so he can start to realize when he is “just a little” mad vs. “really” mad and learn to react accordingly.

4) Build flexibility one small step at a time. One example was to create a “choices when there is a change” jar that can be used when something in their schedule changes. If something gets cancelled and they are very upset they can pick an alternative activity that they love doing that will make the activity getting cancelled a little easier for them.

I’m looking forward to reading the rest of the book. If you have a child with some sensory processing difficulties I thing this book will be beneficial in helping you create the best home environment for your kiddo as possible.

(Disclosure: I received this book for free but all thoughts are my own.)

 

Sevenly’s Weekly Cause: National Autism Association

sevenly 1

I was so happy to see that Sevenly, a for-profit social good company that I love, is supporting another Autism related cause this week! $7 from every single item sold goes directly to the National Autism Association to provide behavioral therapy or communication tools to children with Autism. If you have a loved one with Autism this is a great way to support the cause both financially and with a conversation provoking shirt.

I want to get this fabulous shirt for Lucas:

And this is my favorite one I’d wear myself:

Totally cute, right!? Learn more about this week’s cause and/or purchase an item from Sevenly to support those with Autism here {but keep in mind that each week they change causes so hurry!}

Free Disability Awareness Activities for Kids

disabilities awareness

As a parent of a child with Autism I am anxious for the start of the school year. As much as I worry about how well my son will do, I worry even more about how others will treat him and accept him. I was really excited to get an email from Easter Seals about their free FRIENDS WHO CARE® disability awareness program that helps parents and educators teach kids about children and adults with disabilities. My hope is that every parent will teach their child compassion and acceptance for others.

Sponsored by long-time Easter Seals partner, Friendly’s Restaurants, LLC, FRIENDS WHO CARE is an interactive program that helps students learn how kids with disabilities go to school, make friends and play. It encourages kids to accept their peers with disabilities as people first, and to find ways to include everyone in school and after-school activities.

FRIENDS WHO CARE® is also fun! The curriculum explores a range of disabilities and includes specially crafted learning activities, hands-on exercises, guided discussions and guest speakers. It starts with an introduction to disability, and looks at vision, hearing, and physical disabilities and then at learning disabilities including ADHD, autism and intellectual disabilities.

Visit their Web site to download the free FRIENDS WHO CARE materials!

National Autism Associatio​n’s Give A Voice Program

Give A Voice

I wanted to share about the National Autism Association’s new Give A Voice program. If you have a child with Autism and are in financial need, this is a great program that can help you get a communication device for your child. If you are looking for a great cause to donate to, this post is for you, too. The information below is from the NAA.

The intent of this program is to provide communication devices to individuals with autism who are non-verbal or minimally verbal, and whose communication challenges put them at increased risk of injury or harm.

The NAA has very limited funding to begin this program and will provide communication devices to only fifty applicants during this initial round. Every application will be carefully reviewed and all information submitted will be verified by NAA staff. This program is intended for families who are in dire need of financial assistance and are otherwise unable to attain a communication device.

NAA’s Give A Voice Program will provide qualifying individuals with an assistive communication device including:

- A 16GB Apple® iPad® Mini (WiFi version)
- AppleCare+ Protection Plan
- Proloquo2Go Augmentative and Alternative Communication Software app
- Gripcase Protective Case with Stand – generously donated by Gripcase USA.

Grant applications must be postmarked by July 31, 2013.

For full program details and eligibility requirements, click here.

Funding is desperately needed for this program. To make a tax-deductible donation, please click here.

(Disclosure: I was not compensated for posting this and I am not a member of the NAA. I just thought this may help another Autism family.)

Build A Bear {Wordless Wednesday}

build a bear

Soccer was cancelled the other day due to rain so we headed to Build A Bear to pickup their Autism Awareness Bear. Lucas and Jacob each wanted something different so I got the bear we went for, Lucas got a pink one with a My Little Pony outfit, and Jacob got a white bear in an Iron Man outfit.

***

Lucas loves cuddling with his stuffed friends!

(Disclosure: This is NOT a sponsored post :) Thoughts are my own.)

Free Online Autism Conference 2013

autism conference

As a parent with a child on the spectrum I want to learn as much about Autism and parenting a child with ASD as I can. There are some conferences that I learn about but leaving to attend them is usually not easy to do.

When I learned that this online Autism conference was happening again this year I quickly signed up. I only got to hear a couple speakers last year but I took a ton of notes and learned some valuable information.

If you have a child with Autism I suggest that you sign up for this FREE conference even if you can only make one or two of the webinars. Hurry though! The conference is this weekend!

Register here: http://www.momsfightingautism.com/#register

Autism Awareness Bracelet Giveaway

Autism Awareness Bracelet

I love featuring products that raise awareness for Autism and even more so when the company that makes them donates to the cause. The bracelet above is from Angela Moore and 15% of the proceeds go back to the Autism Society of America. The Autism Awareness collection also includes little girl bracelets, pendants, earrings, necklaces and ties.

GIVEAWAY:

One reader will win the bracelet pictured above

HOW TO ENTER:

{Do any or all of the following, leave a separate comment for each you do}

1) Leave a comment telling me who you want to win the bracelet for

2) Share this giveaway on a social network

3) Comment on another one of my posts

4) Subscribe to this blog {look in upper right corner}

Giveaway ends April 28, 2013 at 11:59pm Central time. Giveaway open to US residents ages 18 and over only.

(Disclosure: I was not compensated for posting this giveaway.)


Products To Help Keep Kids With Autism Safe

tattoos with a purpose

Now that Lucas is getting a little older and more independent I am looking into safety products for children with Autism because he has no fear, often acts without thinking, and will run off if given the chance. Since we will be out and about this summer I want to do everything possible to make sure he is safe.

For today’s Autism related post I wanted to share some products that I’m looking at getting for Lucas who is preschool age. Obviously these products are not substitutes for the watchful eye of a caregiver but instead should be used in addition to correct adult supervision. I am not recommending or endorsing any of these products and am not affiliated with any of them. Check with your child’s doctor first before using any of these.

Tattoos With A Purpose {sold here}

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Angel Guard for Seatbelts {sold here}

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Kid Safety Bands {sold here}

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Window/Door Alarms {sold here}

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Lucas is a little young but I’d get this shirt if he was older…

Alert: I Have Autism Shirt {sold here}

What safety products do you use? I’d love to hear your recommendations in the post comments!

Autism Awareness Shirts From Sevenly

sevenly womens racerback

Each day during the month of April I feature something Autism related. Today I’d like to share about Sevenly and what they are doing to raise money for Autism Speaks this week. (Please note: I am not affiliated with Sevenly in any way.)

This week Sevenly is donating $7 from each purchase to Autism Speaks. Here is what will be done with that money according to Sevenly:

“Technology and sensory therapy play a critical role in helping children with autism develop communication skills. With your support, we will provide tools, resources and therapy to a child with autism. This week, we will provide the most precious gift to families of children with autism; the gift of communication.”

I love this shirt for myself:

buy it here

and this one I want to get for Lucas:

buy it here

Cute clothes for a great cause! They also have men’s shirts. Which one is your favorite?

Light It Up Blue For Autism {April 2nd}

light it up blue

As many of you know my youngest son, Lucas, is on the Autism Spectrum. I’d be honored if you’d join me and Autism Speaks in the “Light It Up Blue” campaign to raise awareness for Autism.

Each April 2, Autism Speaks celebrates Light It Up Blue along with the international autism community, in commemoration of the United Nations-sanctioned World Autism Awareness Day. Light It Up Blue is a unique global initiative that kicks-off Autism Awareness Month and helps raise awareness about autism. In honor of this historic day, many iconic landmarks, hotels, sporting venues, concert halls, museums, bridges and retail stores are among the hundreds of thousands of homes and communities that take part to Light It Up Blue.

Here are some ideas of how you can participate as an individual or family:

  • Where blue clothing tomorrow
  • Purchase a blue light bulb (Walmart and Home Depot stores have them) and change your porch light to a blue bulb
  • Spread the word via social media by updating your Facebook status or tweeting out an Autism fact.
  • Sign the petition to ask President Obama and Congress to develop and implement a comprehensive national plan to address autism.
  • Participate virtually by taking photos on your smartphone and lighting them up blue with a festive picture frame. Email them, or share on your social networks to become part of the Light It Up Blue movement. (Get the app here)
  • Make a donation to Autism Speaks

Here are some facts from Autism Speaks that you can share:

  • Every 11 minutes, a child is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.
  • Autism now affects 1 in 88 children and 1 in 54 boys
  • Autism prevalence figures are growing
  • Autism is the fastest-growing serious developmental disability in the U.S.
  • Autism costs a family $60,000 a year on average
  • Autism receives less than 5% of the research funding of many less prevalent childhood diseases

If you participate I’d love to see pictures! Feel free to share them on the Making Time For Mommy Facebook page :)

Zoos Go Blue

zoos go blue

I recently learned about “Zoos Go Blue” and am really excited to share about this with you all. Through a national partnership with the Association of Zoos & Aquariums, member Zoos & Aquariums from across North America will be participating in the inaugural “ZOOS GO BLUE” event in April to support Autism Awareness Month. Find out if your zoo is participating here. You can register for up to 6 people for free basic admission and parking.

If you live in the Chicago area, Brookfield Zoo’s special event is April 28th. The Zoo is also going blue that day so I’m really excited to visit with my family and see everything lit up blue.

In addition, there is a toolkit for families who want to visit the zoo that will help them prepare their child for the visit. Lucas is a little young for this but I think it’s a great resource for families with older children. (The toolkit can be found at the link provided above.)

(Disclosure: Like most of my Autism related posts this is not sponsored and I’m not affiliated with any Zoo, other than having a membership to one that I paid for with my own money.)

 

Blue Flowers For Autism Awareness

blue flowers

In the month of April you will see a lot of reference to the color blue here on my blog and elsewhere. This is because on April 2nd it is Autism Speaks’ “Light It Up Blue” day to raise awareness for Autism. Some buildings even turn blue! I’ll be sharing more about it on my blog in a few days but wanted to share about FTD’s deals, donation towards Autism Speaks, and especially their BLUE flowers! What a great gift to give a parent raising a child with Autism.

Here’s more information:

FTD is going blue for Autism Speaks! FTD has created a website for all supporters of Autism Speaks! All customers get a 15% discount with orders bought through here: http://www.ftd.com/34384/

PLUS they’re offering an additional 10% of each purchase to be donated back to Autism Speaks. Their network of more than 12,000 florists offer a huge selection of fresh flowers, plants, premium gourmet foods, gifts and gift baskets. Let’s Light It Up Blue and buy something special for your special someone!

(Disclosure: I’m not affiliated with FTD, just had to share what they are doing to help families like mine who have a loved one with Autism.)

AutisMate: iPad App For Children With Autism {$149.99 Value Giveaway}

autismate

AutisMate, a new iPad app from SpecialNeedsWare for those with autism, stands among the most respected and innovative options to help children develop communication and behavioral skills despite the challenges of autism. Individuals are given a comprehensive set of tools to navigate life with ease, providing for the lifelong learning, development and changing experiences of those across the spectrum.

While most autism apps on the market focus singularly on promoting one expressive form of communication, AutisMate recognizes the unique nature of every case of autism and works to first build comprehension on a personalized level to unlock a more varied set of expressions and needs. It allows children with autism along with their caretakers and teachers to easily import personal images, video, audio and other information into a visual scene-based platform.

To save time and effort, users also have the option of uploading videos, stories, and schedules geared specifically for autism from a vast content library. A GPS feature allows scenes to change according to the user’s location, making the software even more intuitive and applicable in real-time. This platform grows with the user and caters to his or her unique needs.

The research-supported app has already helped hundreds of users to fully express themselves and improve connections with their families. Many users have expressed their support for AutisMate and shared stories of success and progress. One testimonial that SpecialNeedsWare has received is from a mother of a 7-year-old boy with autism: “I recently used [Autismate to help my son] understand what would be happening at a hospital visit to have tubes put in his ears (a procedure he had done before and had gotten very upset). This last visit he was calmer and cooperated really well! Thank you so much for providing a tool that gives me a way to help my sweet, loving son find understanding by allowing him to ‘think in pictures’.”

You can learn more about AutisMate at www.autismate.com. To purchase the app on iTunes, click here. Please follow AutisMate on Facebook and Twitter.

GIVEAWAY

One reader will win a download code for this app (a $149.99 value)

HOW TO ENTER

{Do any or all of the following, leave a separate comment for each you do}

1) Tell me why you need this app

2) Share this giveaway on a social network

3) Share this giveaway directly with another parent of a child who has Autism

4) Follow @aliciamarie112 on Twitter

5) Follow @autisMate on Twitter

6) Like Making Time For Mommy on Facebook

7) Like AutisMate on Facebook

8) Comment on another one of my posts

Giveaway ends March 3, 2013 at 11:59pm Central time. Must be 18 or older to enter. Note: This giveaway is for the app only and does not include the iPad.

(Disclosure: I was not compensated for this post and do not have an iPad so I have not used the app. I am posting in hopes that it will help one of my readers. This giveaway is not associated with Facebook in any way.)

 

 

Ability Path’s Holiday Gift Guide For Children With Special Needs

ability path logo

I’m excited to share the 2012 Holiday Gift Guide For Children With Special Needs put together by Ability Path. The guide features gift ideas from many bloggers, including a suggestion from me. If you have a child with Special Needs on your “to buy for” list you have to check this guide out.

You can find the Holiday Gift Guide here. Enjoy! :)

 

Santa Visits For Children With Special Needs

caring-santa-badge-2

Visiting Santa is a really fun Holiday tradition for most families. It’s one I loved as a child and was excited to continue with my own children. The first couple years went well but eventually, visiting Santa became a tradition that I dreaded. It has turned into an overwhelming experience for my boys and as a mom, when my children aren’t having a good time, I’m not enjoying the tradition either.

As a mother of two preschoolers with special needs I am honored that Ability Path contacted me to share about their “Caring Santa”. It brought tears to my eyes to realize that people cared enough about my children and other children with special needs that they’d work together to create this special experience for our children.

This year Caring Santa will be at over 80 locations across the United States. Here are more details from Ability Path: Due to this collaborative effort and greater mall participation this year, more children with special needs and their families will have an opportunity to participate in the time-honored holiday tradition of taking a photo with Santa in an environment set up to support the sensory, physical and other developmental needs of children with all abilities. Each mall will be asked to make some minor modifications to subdue the mall the morning of Caring Santa, and the result of that will be a magical experience for families; and some will walking away with their first-ever holiday photo of their child or family with Santa.  Until now, visiting with Santa and the Bunny really wasn’t a reality for families of children with special needs.

Last year, families who have experienced Caring Santa expressed great appreciation to participating malls for the extra care and welcoming environment.  While the accommodations made are for the child with special needs, often there are siblings who, as a result of their brother or sister’s disability don’t have the opportunity to partake in moments like these. The Caring Santa event is as much for them as it is for the child with a disability.  It is truly a morning for making memories for children of all abilities!

You can look to see if there is a location near you and RSVP by clicking here.

A HUGE thanks to Ability Path, Simon Malls, and Noerr Programs for organizing these events.

(Disclosure: This is not a compensated post.)

 

Jump For Free {And Support Autism Speaks}

pump it up

Most Pump It Up locations are having an open jump tomorrow {Wednesday, July 25th} from 6-8pm so your children can jump for free when you make a donation to Autism Speaks!

Check out their website to see if a location near you is participating!

This Is What Autism Looks Like In My Child {A Response To 50 Cent}

this is what autism looks like

{UPDATE: On July 8th, 50 tweeted this: “I realize my autism comments were insensitive, however it was not my intention to offend anyone and for this I apologize.”}

Some of you may have heard of rapper 50 Cent’s recent comments on Twitter about Autism. I only heard about this today and as a parent of children with special needs, including a child with Autism, I am furious.

Here are the statements he made in response to someone who tweeted him:

‘yeah just saw your picture fool you look autistic’

‘I don’t want no special ed kids on my time line follow some body else’

{You can read the details over at the Huffington Post}

So in response to 50 Cent…

THIS is what Autism looks like in my son, Lucas

Want to support our family and all the other ones who love someone with Autism?

You can tweet: “Hey, @50cent this is what #Autism looks like! http://wp.me/pibQB-3cA via @aliciamarie112″

OR you can share your thoughts on his Facebook page

Autism Doesn’t End In April…

autism_doesnt_end_in_april_mug

image from cafepress.com

Throughout the month of April I have posted every weekday for Autism Awareness Month. This will be my last daily post but definitely not my last Autism related post. The support that I have gotten from those that are also affected by Autism has been overwhelming and I have enjoyed sharing personal stories, resources, and quotes I have found along the way.

What kind of Autism related posts would you like to see here at Making Time For Mommy?

What are you doing? – A Film About Autism {Trailer}

Here is more information on this film from Autism Awareness {Australia}:

“What are you doing?” is a short film, created by Autism Awareness, which aims to teach school aged children about acceptance and understanding of their peers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

The film addresses some of the fears children may have about ASD, answers their questions and helps show them how they can be a great friend to a classmate on the autism spectrum. The film includes enlightening interviews with the brothers, sisters, cousins and friends of children on the spectrum. These friends and family members share their thoughts and experiences on what it is like to share their life with someone on the spectrum.

Through beautiful imagery, engaging narrative and quirky animation, the film sends a message that children with autism should be accepted, supported and encouraged by their peers to be a part of their community.

“What are you doing?” will be screened at schools across Australia later this year and we hope, in the future, throughout the world!

*****

Here’s my question:

How do we get this film shown in schools here in the States?

This is a film that desperately needs to be seen by children in our schools.

Sensory Friendly Films At AMC Theatres

sensory friendly films

AMC Theatres offers sensory friendly movies once or twice a month at many of their theaters across the nation. I’ve written about this program before but wanted to share the newest movies being offered. Here are the movies they plan on showing from now through the end of the summer:

May 5 – Pirates! Band of Misfits

June 16 – Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted

June 30 – Brave

July 21 – Ice Age: Continental Drift

August 11 – Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days

*****

*More details can be found here*

The Stories Of Autism Gallery Is Live

stories of autism

Last month I told you about Stories Of Autism and the great photography experience we had with Megan of Firefly Nights Photography. {If you missed it you can find that post here}. I have been checking to see if the gallery was live pretty much every day and I’m happy to say that it went live this past weekend! Along with the beautiful photography are some stories and words full of love from the parents that raise these amazing children. {You will notice mine is a little short but that’s because I thought we were only supposed to write a couple sentences.}

**CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE COMPLETE 2012 STORIES OF AUTISM PHOTO GALLERY!!**

Donate To Autism Speaks With Swagbucks

Swagbucks is an online portal dedicated to helping you earn digital dollars called “Swag Bucks”, which can be redeemed for exclusive Swagbucks.com merchandise. You can earn points for doing various things like using their “search” function when looking for something online, taking quizzes, watching videos, and a variety of other things. I earn most of my points by searching for information on the web and then redeem my points for gift cards.

Along with great products, Swagbucks normally features a charity of the month that you can donate your Swagbucks to. This month they have teamed up with Autism Speaks so people can donate their Swagbucks to Autism Speaks. Here are more details from the Swagbucks website: “The Swag Bucks you donate all this month will be turned into a cash donation, given directly to Autism Speaks. Every Swag Buck you donate will help make life easier and more manageable for those with autism and those supporting them. Every Swag Bucks donated equal $0.01, so donating 1,000 Swag Bucks is equivalent to donating ten dollars. The deadline for donations is Tuesday May 1st at 12:00pm PT.”

Want to donate your Swagbucks to Autism Speaks? Click HERE to find out how! Not a member yet? It’s easy to join and start earning. Click HERE to join!
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(Disclosure: I was not compensated for this post. I have used my Swagbucks referral link though so when you win, I win!)

New Android Phone Apps For Children With Autism

autism apps

You can download the apps in the Google Play store here. Some are free and some cost 99 cents.

(Disclosure: I was not compensated for this post. I received this email today and wanted to share this resource.)

Special Needs Moms {A Look Inside}

special needs moms

My cousin posted this on Facebook. I’m not sure of it’s origins but I just had to share :)

Autism Graphics

I came across a site today called My Autie Space that’s full of amazing Autism related graphics that can be shared online {they even have code boxes for easy sharing!}. Here are some of my favorites:

For Kids:

For Parents:

For Teachers:

For Autism Awareness Month:

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Find many more graphics at My Autie Space!

A Mother’s Autism Prayer

A Mother's Autism Prayer

by Elizabeth Scott, author of Raindrops on Roman
Overcoming Autism:  A Message of Hope
www.rdrpublishers.com

© 2009 Robert D. Reed Publishers
THIS BOOK IS NOW AVAILABLE ON KINDLE (click here)