Tips For Dealing With Seasonal Grass Allergies

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This post is sponsored by Stallergenes Greer. Disclaimer: I am not a Doctor and this should not be taken as medical advice. Please consult your Doctor before starting this, or any other, medication or treatment plan. I am not on ORALAIR® (Sweet Vernal, Orchard, Perennial Rye, Timothy, and Kentucky Blue Grass Mixed Pollens Allergen Extract) Tablet for Sublingual Use; however, I am sharing because I thought it may help one of you.

The cooler weather here in Chicago seems never ending so I’m already dreaming of the warmer months that are coming in the (seemingly not-so-near) future. I love when the warmer weather comes because nicer days mean vacations, outdoor sports, time by the pool, concerts in the park, and camping. I like everything about the warmer months, except for the allergies they bring. It’s frustrating when being outside doing fun things with my family means itchy eyes, sneezing, a runny nose, and general congestion for me.

As an allergy sufferer I wanted to share some of the things that have worked for me when it comes to dealing with seasonal allergies.

First, I recommend staying inside (with the windows closed) as much as possible on days that allergens are bad. When you check the weather forecast each day you can also look at an allergy tracker that lets you know what pollen levels are like outside. I get an alert on my phone (you can easily set one up using IFTTT) when pollen is high, too, so I’m aware of the pollen count without having to look at the allergy tracker every day.

When you have to go outside on high pollen days, avoid activities that will stir up the allergens- like mowing the lawn. I’d also suggest taking off your shoes and changing your clothes when you come inside so you don’t spread the allergens around your home. (If you have time for a shower that’s great to do as well but I know it’s not always possible to shower mid-day -especially when you have little ones!)

Also, if you have an allergy to grass pollen, you should visit your doctor to talk about sublingual immunotherapy, like ORALAIR. ORALAIR is an FDA approved medicine prescribed to treat sneezing, runny nose or itchy eyes for patients 10-65 years old, who have been diagnosed with an allergy to any of the five grass pollens. The therapy works by providing the patient a small amount of allergen in a pill under the tongue daily and it can be taken at home after the first dose is administered in the doctor’s office. This sublingual immunotherapy may be considered for children 10 and over and adults who can’t or won’t consider allergy shots. In children and adults, the most commonly reported side effects were itching of the mouth, lips, tongue or throat. These side effects, by themselves, are not dangerous or life-threatening. ORALAIR can cause severe allergic reactions that may be life-threatening. Symptoms of allergic reactions to ORALAIR include: trouble breathing, throat tightness or swelling, trouble swallowing or speaking, dizziness or fainting, rapid or weak heartbeat, severe stomach cramps or pain, vomiting, or diarrhea, severe flushing or itching of the skin. For more information, check out: http://www.oralair.com/assets/pdf/ORALAIR%20Med%20Guide.pdf

While I am not on ORALAIR, the reason I’m sharing about seasonal grass allergies so early in the year is because sublingual immunotherapy requires patients to begin treatment as early as winter before the start of grass allergy season so I wanted to give everyone plenty of time to look into this option in case it may help one of you.

The good news though, is that ORALAIR can reduce grass allergy symptoms within the first allergy season it is taken. It can also help patients take less of other allergy medicine during the grass allergy season. Over time, ORALAIR is effective in relieving grass allergy symptoms—not only in the first pollen season after you begin treatment, but also year after year for up to three years of treatment. ORALAIR can help you reduce your grass allergy symptoms like runny or itchy nose, itchy and watery eyes, sneezing and nasal congestion.

Here are some topics and questions that you may want to discuss with your doctor to learn more about your grass allergies and treatment options, including ORALAIR:

- What is allergy immunotherapy?
- How can I find out if I’m allergic to grass pollen?
- Could ORALAIR be an appropriate treatment option to help relieve my symptoms?
- How does the treatment routine for ORALAIR differ from my current one?
- How should I take ORALAIR?
- Are there support resources available for patients taking ORALAIR?
- How much does ORALAIR cost? Is it covered by my insurance?

What would you enjoy doing outside if your seasonal allergies were under control?

Disclaimer: I am not a Doctor and this should not be taken as medical advice. Please consult your Doctor before starting this, or any other, medication or treatment plan.

 

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Indications and Usage

ORALAIR (Sweet Vernal, Orchard, Perennial Rye, Timothy, and Kentucky Blue Grass Mixed Pollens Allergen Extract) is a prescription medicine used for sublingual (under the tongue) immunotherapy prescribed to treat sneezing, runny or itchy nose, nasal congestion or itchy and watery eyes due to allergy to these grass pollens. ORALAIR may be prescribed for persons 10 to 65 years old whose doctor has confirmed are allergic to at least one of these five grass pollens.

ORALAIR is taken about four months before the expected start of the grass pollen season and is continued throughout the grass pollen season.

ORALAIR is NOT a medication that gives immediate relief of allergy symptoms.

Important Safety Information

ORALAIR can cause severe allergic reactions that may be life-threatening. Symptoms of allergic reactions to ORALAIR include:

- Trouble breathing
- Throat tightness or swelling
- Trouble swallowing or speaking
- Dizziness or fainting
- Rapid or weak heartbeat
- Severe stomach cramps or pain, vomiting, or diarrhea
- Severe flushing or itching of the skin

If any of these symptoms occur, stop taking ORALAIR and immediately seek medical care. For home administration of ORALAIR, your doctor should prescribe auto-injectable epinephrine for you to keep at home for treating a severe reaction, should one occur. Your doctor will train and instruct you on the proper use of auto-injectable epinephrine.

Do not take ORALAIR if you or your child:

- Has severe, unstable, or uncontrolled asthma;
- Had a severe allergic reaction in the past that included trouble breathing, dizziness or fainting, or rapid or weak heartbeat;
- Has ever had difficulty with breathing due to swelling of the throat or upper airway after using any sublingual immunotherapy before;
- Has ever been diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis; or
- Is allergic to any of the inactive ingredients contained in ORALAIR.

Stop taking ORALAIR and contact your doctor if you or your child has any mouth surgery procedures (such as tooth removal), develops any mouth infections, ulcers or cuts in the mouth or throat, or has heartburn, difficulty swallowing, pain with swallowing, or chest pain that does not go away or worsens.

In children and adults, the most commonly reported side effects were itching of the mouth, lips, tongue or throat. These side effects, by themselves, are not dangerous or life-threatening.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800- FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. Talk to your doctor before using ORALAIR while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide.

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Comments

  1. robin rue says:

    My hayfever is BAD this year. I started taking med early so it’s better this time around.

  2. Autumn Reo says:

    I’ve seen my Huz get so miserable and stopped up with allergies… I now have to pay attention to these things! I know, now, why allergy meds exist!

  3. Jeni Hawkins says:

    I totally didn’t know most of this about allergies! I have a friend that works outside and is super allergic to grass. I’ll tell him to change his clothes and shower right when he gets home!

  4. Amy says:

    My youngest daughter has seasonal allergies. It is sad to see her all itchy, drippy, and run down.

  5. Kathy says:

    Allergies are horrible this time of year. I know a few people that have bad seasonal allergies. I’m lucky enough not to, but hard to see anyone suffer from allergies.

  6. krystal says:

    Some years are SO bad! These tips will make it easier on us.

  7. I have grass allergies! Every year, I deal with that! Thank you for all the tips!

  8. janis says:

    Thanks so much for such an informative post. My family has some serious grass allergies and your tips are helpful.

  9. These are awesome tips! Really helpful! Thanks for sharing!

  10. Dawn Lopez says:

    Allergy season is hitting hard this year so this is a very timely post to read. I saw a few myths in your list I never knew about either!

  11. This is a great post. I have grass allergies and I can’t find relief. The only symptom I have is itchy eyes and nothing works.

  12. Reesa Lewandowski says:

    my whole family is suffering. I appreciate your tips!

  13. Scott says:

    Our local news keeps track of pollen levels for us. This year it wasn’t grass, but tree pollen that was extremely high!

  14. Sarah says:

    These are great tips. Allergies seems to be crazy this year and starting earlier than normal.

  15. Sapana V says:

    I haven’t heard about these allergies. However, they seem serious and one need to be precautions.

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